Hand and wrist treatments tailored to you

At Manchester Hand Surgeons, we continuously work hard to stay abreast of new developments, the latest treatments, and the most effective medicines around. Supporting all hand and wrist complaints, our team are the orthopaedic specialists of choice throughout the North West of England.

At our clinic based in South Manchester, our team will not only carry out the initial consultation, examination, and paperwork gathering; we will also advise you on the best course of treatment and carry out the specified treatment too.

Specialists in the intricacies of hand and wrist surgery, our team specialise in a range of hand and wrist conditions.

We understand how important the hand is to everyday life, and we know the problems you may face when elements of your hand no longer work or perform as they should, causing you considerable pain and discomfort.

That’s why we work with you. We consider all of your symptoms, history, pain thresholds, and more, to make the most informed and suitable treatment plan tailored for you.

Taking care of Manchester’s Hands.

Hand and wrist treatments

Hand and wrist conditions we treat

Kunal and Iain are renowned throughout South Manchester for being amongst the top orthopaedic surgeons of choice for many happy customers.

Kunal and Iain's knowledge, experience, and expertise have allowed Manchester Hand Surgeons to offer a range of services to customers.

These services include treatments for:

Arthritis of the hand surgery and treatment

Arthritis of the Hand

Whether Rheumatoid or Osteoarthritis, arthritis of the hand can be painful and limit movement.  We offer both non surgical and surgical solutions ...

Arthritis of the thumb surgery and treatment

Arthritis Of The Thumb

Swelling, pain or loss of flexibility in the movement of your thumb can be a sign of arthritis of the thumb. There are a range of treatments available, both surgical and non-surgical.

Carpal tunnel surgery and treatment

Carpal Tunnel Release

We treat the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome by relieving the pressure on the nerve, enlarging the carpal tunnel and reducing the pain experienced.

Dupuytrens contracture surgery and treatment

Dupuytren's Contracture

A condition which causes fingers to bend towards the palm and remain in a flexed position. Treatment options include splints, needle fasciotomy, fasciectomy and more.

Anatomy of the hand

Hand Anatomy

Bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, tendons, nerves and blood vessels are all working together to allow your hands to perform their functions.

Hand fracture surgery and treatment

Hand Fractures

Include broken hand (boxers fracture, bennetts fracture, reverse bennett’s fracture) and broken fingers and thumbs. The best course of treatment will depend on the parts of the bones that are fractured.

Rheumatoid arthritis in hands treatment

Rheumatoid Hand

A long-term condition causing joint stiffness, pain and swelling. Treatment ranges from drug therapy, physical therapy and surgery depending on your individual cirmcumstances.

Scaphoid fracture treatment and surgery

Scaphoid Fractures

Affect the boat-shaped bone (scaphoid bone) at the joint of your wrist.  Treatment can include cast treatment and surgery (including screw fixation, scaphoid debridement, bone grafts).

Wrist arthroscopy

Wrist Arthroscopy

Keyhole surgery  will enable us to diagnose and treat hand and wrist complaints such as cartilage damage, injuries to ligaments, arthritis of the thumb/hand, joint infections, and much more.

Ganglion cyst wrist treatment

Wrist Ganglions

Treatment of wrist ganglions can include anti-inflammatory medications, splints, draining the cyst, removing the cyst entirely through open surgery or keyhole surgery. 

Trigger finger release surgery

Trigger Finger Release

Trigger finger can be treated using a variety of non-surgical and surgical treatments, including percutaneous trigger finger release surgery to prevent that clicking sensation or limited movement.

Wrist arthroscopy

Mucous Cysts

Small, fluid-filled sacs, mucous cysts tend to appear at the joint nearest the fingernail.  We may recommend leaving them to dissolve on their own or if the cyst is causing problems, we will operate.

Find out more about your hand anatomy

Conditions and their Treatment

 

Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery

Swelling in hand, placing pressure on the nerves, hence causing considerable pain when moving or bending fingers. We treat the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome by relieving the pressure on the nerve, enlarging the carpal tunnel and reducing the pain experienced.

Wrist Arthroscopy

A form of keyhole surgery that allows us to gain a bird’s eye view of your wrist. Keyhole surgery in this capacity will enable us to diagnose and treat hand and wrist complaints such as cartilage damage, tears in the cartilages found in hand, injuries to ligaments, arthritis of the thumb/hand, joint infections, and much more.

Hand Fractures

Include broken hand (boxers fracture, bennetts fracture, reverse bennett’s fracture) and broken fingers and thumbs.

Scaphoid Fractures

Affect the boat-shaped bone (scaphoid bone) at the joint of your wrist.  Treatment can include cast treatment and surgery (including screw fixation, scaphoid debridement, bone grafts).

Trigger Finger Release

Tendons become inflamed and swollen, making the finger catch, resulting in a clicking sensation and difficulty in bending or straightening the affected digits.  Trigger finger can be treated using a variety of non-surgical and surgical treatments, including percutaneous trigger finger release surgery.

Dupuytren’s Contracture

A condition which causes fingers to bend towards the palm and remain in a flexed position. Treatment options include splints, needle fasciotomy, fasciectomy and more.

Arthritis of the Hand

we can provide a range of surgical and non-surgical treatments for both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hand.  Treatments such as arthrodesis, arthroplasty, arthroscopic synovectomy, drug therapy and more.

Wrist Ganglions

A fluid-filled lump that has developed near to or on the joint or tendon on your hand. Treatment of wrist ganglions can include anti-inflammatory medications, splints, draining the cyst, removing the cyst entirely through open surgery or keyhole surgery. 

Mucous Cysts

Small, fluid-filled sacs, mucous cysts tend to appear at the joint nearest the fingernail.  We may recommend leaving them for a set period for them to dissolve and disappear on their own or if the cyst is causing problems, we will recommend surgery as the best course of action.

Complications post-surgery

For all extremely rare, as with all surgery, complications can arise with surgery performed on the hand or wrist.

It’s essential to know the risks associated with the surgeries we provide as well as discussing these in further detail with your surgical team during your appointment.

At Manchester Hand Surgeons, we’re here to help put your mind at rest, and we’re happy to answer all of your questions, no matter how small or trivial they may feel, trust us, we understand how important it is to get the right and honest answer.

Below we have provided some of the most common complications that may occur.  Again, complications are very rare with hand surgery, with our patients reporting high success rates and overall good experience.

Surgical complications relating to the hand

Symptoms remain

It is our ultimate aim at Manchester Hand Surgeons to resolve all hand issues and difficulties experienced by our patients; it’s what we’re renowned for. However, we can’t always 100% guarantee to be able to resolve all symptoms completely. On very rare occasions, and for reasons beyond our control, surgery may not help to solve your hand complaint, or indeed, resolve it in its entirety.

Of course, this does depend on several factors, including the complexity of your case, and our team will discuss and talk through all of this with you during your initial examinations.

Increased risk of infection

As with any surgery, there is an increased risk of infection, and surgery on the hand is no different. Signs of potential infection include pain, redness, and swelling, (typically developing 3 to 10 days after surgery). (Swelling and redness may be apparent 1 to 2 days after surgery, this is a normal reaction post-surgery and should be nothing to be overly concerned about).

Approximately one in 20 patients develop a lump, no larger than a pinhead, which fills with puss, generally found around dissolvable sutures. In these cases, this will need popping, and rather than an infection, it is usually a reaction due to the dissolvable stitch. The team at Manchester Hand Surgeons will be able to help you with this if required.

It is crucial that if you do believe your hand or wrist has become infected that you contact us immediately, and we can treat your wounds appropriately.

We can help treat most infections with clean dressings and antibiotics, however, if a deep infection is apparent, we may need to clean the wound by carrying out a further operation, as well as provide intravenous antibiotics.

Pain is not subsiding

After surgery, most patients will experience a certain level of discomfort and pain. Most patients manage this with over the counter painkillers and ice packs to help reduce swelling.

Your post-operative care, including pain relief, will be discussed at length with you post-surgery. We know everyone is different, and we ensure that we tailor post-operative treatment plans accordingly.

Swelling

You will experience some swelling after your surgery and ice packs can help to reduce this and ease any pain. Swelling should subside during week one; however, if your hand or area of the wound is still considerably swollen after a couple of weeks, it is essential to contact us for further review.

Wound is bleeding

It is expected that general ooze onto the dressings will appear immediately after your operation, this is entirely normal and is preferred, as it can avoid the blood remaining in and around the wound and forming a haematoma, which is more likely to suffer an infection.

However, it would be unusual for the wound to continue bleeding, and if this is the case, we would like you to come back to the surgery to see us for a review.

If a haematoma does occur and a build-up of blood is apparent, we would need to release this, however, it’s important to note, this is very, very rare.

Scarring

Due to the minimally invasive procedures now available, scars due to hand surgery tend to heal well with most becoming barely noticeable after time. Stitches found on the hands palm are typically exposed and interrupted stitches. Stitches on the back of your hand are known as subcuticular stitches and will be unseen under the skin (aside from two stitch knots found either side of the incision).

Bruising

Bruising is entirely normal and should be expected to a certain degree. Bruising will typically start red after the first few days post-surgery, turning black and blue as the days go on, before eventually fading away.

Stiffness

Immediately after surgery, your joints and movement may feel stiff and slightly restricted. This is due to internal scarring and healing, and we would expect most movement to return after a set period.

However, in some cases, there may be a permanent restriction of movement, but we find this does not cause a functional problem.

We can help to provide exercises as well as refer you for physiotherapy if required.

Weakness

Weakness in your hand can be a result of ongoing pain, as well as a reduction in overall movement. We would always look to maintain or indeed increase strength over time; however, some patients may experience a small amount of weakness. (More severe cases where weakness is experienced to a high degree in the hand and wrist following surgery would be extremely rare).

Numbness

If a sensory nerve has been bruised during surgery, numbness may occur; however, this should resolve itself within 3 to 6 months. If the nerve has been cut, however, numbness may never subside.

Nerve Damage

Nerves can become damaged or injured as a result of injury, and in extremely rare cases, can be damaged during surgery.

If nerves are affected in any way, overall movement and function can be affected. If nerves are bruised (known as neuropraxia), recovery is possible, but this will take a few months.

Nerves that have been permanently damaged can leave areas of weakness or numbness to the surrounding muscle.

Neuroma

When a nerve in hand becomes injured neuroma occurs. When the end of a nerve has been damaged or cut, it can overgrow and form a tangled lump of nerve tissue. This tangled web can become very painful and tender in hand.

At Manchester Hand Surgeons, we will work to find the best treatment for you if you are suffering from the neuroma. This may include desensitising the area through hand therapy, neuromodulation (vibrations used to settle and re-educate the nerve end), or further surgery.

Further injury to tendons

There is a chance that tendons can be injured during surgery, and if this is the case (albeit very rare) it can affect the movement in the joint. Our surgeons identify all tendons during operation and protect them accordingly, however on extremely rare occasions they can become injured.

Tendons can rupture unprompted (this is most commonly seen after treatment of wrist fractures), and others can rupture if the patient is suffering from rheumatoid arthritis or if the tendon passes over any sharp, rough edges of the bone.

Dislocation

Dislocation is when a joint moves out of place. In these instances, patients will feel extreme pain and reduced or limited movement. Treatment to support a dislocation is to put the joint back into place and then stabilise it with a cast/splint. In severe, and again rare occasions, a further operation may be necessary to stabilise the joint further.

Instability

Instability is caused when ligaments within the hand are damaged or injured during surgery. Our surgeons workaround all-important ligaments, avoiding injuring them at all costs. However, during more extensive surgery, including joint replacement or joint reconstruction, ligaments do not perform as well, which can cause instability, and possibly lead to dislocation.

CRPS (Complex Regional Pain Syndrome)

CRPS is a condition that can happen after an injury, as well as surgery.

To reduce CRPS from occurring, we advise all our patients to move their hands and fingers as soon as possible after surgery, helping to avoid joints stiffening and reduce any swelling.

CRPS causes swelling, redness, and pain in the affected area. In severe cases of CRPS, the hand may become shiny and red, with abnormal hair growth forming.

At Manchester Hand Surgeons, we will provide you with a range of hand exercises and stretches post-op to help keep CRPS rates low and keep your hands moving.

Joint Replacement

Replacement joints do have a lifespan, and as they wear over time, they may need changing and replacing with a new implant.

Joint replacements can also cause bone fractures as the implant is inserted. However, depending on the bone in question, it would depend on the treatment provided.

Compartment Syndrome

Compartment syndrome is a harrowing condition that can occur when there is the pressure within the muscles, with this pressure building to dangerous levels.

Swelling, as well as a tingling sensation in the fingers, will occur, as well as extreme pain when moving your hand and fingers.

The pressure experienced can decrease blood flow, which stops oxygen and nourishment from reaching the muscle and nerve cells.

In these cases, emergency surgery will be required to release the pressure, either through removing the dressing and splint or in extreme situations by carrying out open surgery to release the fibrous bags causing the pressure.

An intolerance to the cold

Cold intolerance can be caused due to a sustained injury to the hand as well as surgery. Symptoms may include a change in the hand/fingers colour, pain, joint stiffness, and an altered sensation.

These symptoms generally improve over time; however, if 18 months have passed, these symptoms may become permanent.

Non-union / Malunion

Bones need time to heal, especially after surgery. However, sometimes bones do not heal or fuse together, where a failure to heal is known as a non-union. Malunion occurs if the bone does heal but does so in an abnormal position.

Depending on the situation and the patient, non-unions can be painful or painless.

If the bone is not healing on its own and becomes painful, further surgery may be required. If the condition is painless, we may be able to stabilise the bone without further investigation.

Smoking can affect how bones heal, and we will always recommend stopping several months before your surgery if you want a successful outcome.

All of these risks are risks prone to most surgeries. At Manchester Hand Surgeons, we feel it is important to understand the complications and risks so you can make the most informed decision for you.

However, and no matter the surgery, at Manchester Hand Surgeons, we’re with you every step of the way. Available to answer your questions and queries in a heartbeat.
Our team are true professionals and renowned for our high success rates and happy patients.

Book your appointment with us today.

Hand and Wrist Treatments, you can trust

What makes us different at Manchester Hand Surgeons is that we understand that every patient is unique, and hence every condition experienced will affect people in different ways.

That’s why we tailor our treatment plans and options to suit you. Identifying the right course of action and the right treatment to treat a range of conditions successfully is what we do best.

Don’t continue to suffer in silence; let the professional team at Manchester Hand Surgeons help you.

Book your consultation with us today and see how we can help improve your hands.

Call 01625 881200 to speak to a member of our team

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